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Information Price Watcher
With so much free information available on the internet twenty four hours a day the number of newspaper and magazine subscriptions have gone down. However, many online information and news portals have started bringing in paid for access, limiting non subscribers to basic content. An example of this is the New York Times, which now charges users for full access to its website by erecting a 'paywall', charging between a few dollars a week up to five dollars, depending on how much you wish to read. Non subscribers are still able to view up to twenty articles each month.

If you do need to access niche industry information, such as legal, medical, banking or business information you could be better off subscribing to a paid digital portal. How much people are willing to pay for information varies greatly, charging too much could potentially hurt a business but on the other hand paid for media or products are often considered more valuable to the users than free information.



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    While still in college, Bill Gates and Paul Allen once built a special purpose machine called "Traff-O-Data." It was a machine that would analyze information gathered by traffic monitors. They never found any buyers.